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Places of Interest

History of Aurangabad

The city was founded in 1610 by Malik Ambar, the Prime Minister of Murtaza. Nizam Shah of Ahmadnagar on the site of a village called Khadki. He made it his capital and the men of his army raised their dwellings around it. Within a decade Khadki grew into a populous and imposing city. Malik Ambar died in 1626. He was succeeded by his son Fateh Khan who changed the name of Khadki to Fatehnagar. With the capture of Daulatabad in 1633, the Nizam Shahi dominions, including Fatehnagar, came under the possession of the Moghals. In 1653 when Prince Aurangzeb was appointed the viceroy of the Deccan for the second time, he made Fatehnagar his capital and called it Aurangabad.

Tourist attractions :

Bibi Ka Maqbara :

 Bibi Ka Maqbara: Situated about 3 km from the city is Bibi Ka Maqbara, the burial place of Aurangzeb’s wife, Rabia-ud-Durrani. It is an imitation of the Taj at Agra, and, due to its similar design, it is popularly known as the Mini Taj of the Deccan. The Maqbara stands in the middle of a spacious and formally planned Mughal garden with axial ponds, fountains, water channels, broad pathways and pavilions. Behind the mausoleum is a small archaeological museum.

Panchakki, Baba Shah Mosafar Dargah, 1880s

Panchakki (water mill): Housed in the Dargah complex of Baba Shah Musafir, this is a 17th-century water mill situated at a distance of 1 km from the city. An intriguing water mill, the Panchakki is famous for its underground water channel, which traverses more than 8 km to its source away in the mountains. The channel culminates in a mesmerising artificial waterfall that powers the mill. The beauty of the mosque housed in the inner enclosure is enhanced by a series of ‘dancing’ water fountains.    

Gates in Aurangabad :

One of the things that make Aurangabad stand out from the several other medieval cities in India are its 52 ‘gates’, each of which have a local history, or had individuals linked with them. Not many people are aware that Aurangabad is also known as the ‘City of Gates’. Bhadkal Gate, built by Malik Ambar in commemoration of his victory against the Mughals

Painting from the Ajanta caves

   Ajanta Caves : The Ajanta Caves in Maharashtra, India are 31 rock-cut cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BC. The caves include paintings and sculptures considered to be masterpieces of both Buddhist religious art (which depict the Jataka tales) as well as frescos which are reminiscent of the Sigiriya paintings in Sri Lanka.

Kailasha temple at Ellora

    Ellora Caves : Ellora is an archaeological site, 30 km (19 mi) built by the Rashtrakuta rulers. Well known for its monumental caves, Ellora is a World Heritage Site. Ellora represents the epitome of Indian rock-cut architecture. The 34 “caves”, actually structures excavated out of the vertical face of the Charanandri hills, being Buddhist, Hindu and Jain rock-cut temples and monasteries, were built between the 5th and 10th centuries.

Daulatabad Fort

   Daulatabad : Daulatabad, meaning “City of Prosperity”, is a 14th-century fort city in Maharashtra, about 16 kilometers northwest of Aurangabad. The place was once as known as Deogiri. Starting in 1327, it famously remained the capital of Tughlaq dynasty, under Muhammad bin Tughluq (r. 1325-1351), who also changed its name, and forcibly moved the entire population of Delhi here for two years, before it was abandoned due to lack of water.